formlines:

Raven and the Beauty of Eagle SpiritLance Twitchell
Third Place, Contemporary.  Sealaska Heritage Juried Art Show and Competition, 2010

formlines:

Raven and the Beauty of Eagle Spirit
Lance Twitchell

Third Place, Contemporary.  Sealaska Heritage Juried Art Show and Competition, 2010

(via gatitaborrachita)

dynamicafrica:

Photographic works taken by Kélétigui Touré in Mali during the 1940s.

Recently came across this small collection of studio portraits taken by another great Malian portrait photographer, Kélétigui Touré.

Touré, who was born in 1922, passed away in 1998. Along with the likes of Seydou Keita, Malick Sidibe and Adama Kouyaté, he was part of the group of photographers who operated studios in Mali in the years prior to and after the country’s independence from France. Although Touré is one of the lesser known photographers, his work is incredibly striking and greatly stands out from his peers.

All these photographers were taken during the 1940s.

(via black-culture)

vivaillajams:

http://www.gofundme.com/JamillaOkuboParsoTuition

Hello,

My name is Jamilla Okubo. I am an Kenyan-American artist from Washington, D.C. Currently residing in New York City attending Parsons the New School for Design. I am currently a rising senior at Parsons studying Integrated Fashion Design (undergraduate), with a background in Fine Arts, and a focus on textiles and fashion design. 

I have been attending Parsons for three years now and I am getting ready to graduate this year as well as complete my senior thesis. I am currently $72,000 in debt to Parsons the New School for Design. For the past three years my mother has assisted me by  paying the remainder of my tuition with the Parent Plus Loan. My mother has borrowed $43,000 of the Direct Parent Plus loan. I still owe $12,000 for my last (senior) year at Parsons and mother and I can no longer take out Direct Plus Loans. 

I hope to be that minority student of color at Parsons, who represents the school, and inspires my younger siblings, and other minority/low-income students globally, to have the ambition and drive that I have, and not let financial issues get in the way of it.

I need $10, 787 to pay for the rest of my tuition for my last year at Parsons.

USAGE OF FUNDS:

-Tuition: $10,787
-School Supplies (Fabric, muslin, pattern paper, designing tools, paint, canvases, lab fees, books, fieldtrip fees)

ABOUT ME & MY PURPOSE AS AN ARTIST:

 As a multidisciplinary artist I am able to combine my skills and knowledge to create and express myself. My artwork mainly focuses on people of the Diaspora (people of color), whom I consider my community. I use my artistic disciplines as tools to challenge myself in ways to give back to my community, educate, and empower them as well as the rest of the world.

It is my duty to remind people of color that we have such a rich culture, and that we should love ourselves and one another. I create artwork for my community, because I believe that my purpose as an artist of color is to empower and educate my community.

My artistic discipline connects me to my community by allowing me to create artwork that my community is able to enjoy, embrace, and share with others. I not only create my artwork for myself, but what I express through the medium that I use, is a story that many in my community can relate to. When it comes to creating, I strongly believe in the fact that, 

“Black art controls the “Negro’s” reality, negates negative influences, and creates positive images,”

A quote by Sonia Sanchez. As an artist of color coming from a low-income, single-mother household background, I am able to speak for many in my community from both my experiences growing up as well as express the beauty and hardships of my community’s culture and history. Being able to paint allows me to create for myself but also allows my work to connect to so many from my community. That is the beauty of being an artist, being able to express shared feelings and experiences with your community, where they can also can all take something from what you create.
There is so much to learn, and from that form of inspiration and influence, I create.

RECENT INTERVIEWS:

OkayAfrica:  http://www.okayafrica.com/news/jamilla-okubo-textiles-paintings/#slide1

AADAT:  www.aadatart.com/interview-jamilla-okubo-on-her-cultural-background-creative-inspirations-and-favourite-things/

Portfolio Website www.jamillaokubo.com
Shop my art prints here: http://aadatart.com/product-category/art-prints/jamilla-okubo/

SPREAD THE WORD TUMBLR FAMILY! I LOVE YALL!

*SIGNAL BOOST THIS PLEASEEEEE*  

(via navigatethestream)

talesofthestarshipregeneration:

This book just changed my writing practice and my conception of myself as a black woman creative. It is glorious. I suggest it to all and sundry. 
The one thing I remember disliking was Alice Walkers comment that black audiences are lazy for preferring sung and spoken lit over written lit like books. Bullshit. Oral lit is quite fucking fine as a medium for storytelling to begin with and considering the substandard westernised bs that passes for education… i am very surprised she said that. Oh well. We all have prejudices…
And dear god I wish I knew Toni Cade Bambara in particular. LOVE her interview here. 
http://www.amazon.com/Black-Women-Writers-Work-Paper/dp/0826402437
http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/black-women-writers-at-work-claudia-tate/1001981109?ean=9780826402325

talesofthestarshipregeneration:

This book just changed my writing practice and my conception of myself as a black woman creative. It is glorious. I suggest it to all and sundry. 

The one thing I remember disliking was Alice Walkers comment that black audiences are lazy for preferring sung and spoken lit over written lit like books. Bullshit. Oral lit is quite fucking fine as a medium for storytelling to begin with and considering the substandard westernised bs that passes for education… i am very surprised she said that. Oh well. We all have prejudices…

And dear god I wish I knew Toni Cade Bambara in particular. LOVE her interview here. 

http://www.amazon.com/Black-Women-Writers-Work-Paper/dp/0826402437

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/black-women-writers-at-work-claudia-tate/1001981109?ean=9780826402325

beautiesofafrique:

doormouseetcappendix:

masters of speculative fiction : Nnedi Okorafor

Support African authors!

artblackafrica:

Tanzanian artist Rehema Chachage (Dar es Salaam, 1987) creates video, sculptural, performance and image installations which explore the theme of gender, identity, voicelessness and alienation. She graduated in 2009 with a BFA from Michaelis School of Fine Art, University of Cape Town. Her artistic pieces make use of ritualization, subversion and tension, reflecting the four years she spent in South Africa as a ‘cultural foreigner’ and as a black female student in a predominantly white middle-class setting.

Mizizi/Nasaba explores the state of bereavement and the politics of gender in African society when it comes to inheritance. It consists of digital prints that document a relationship between a bereaved daughter and the text that was left behind by her deceased father—which is her only true inheritance since all material inheritance (according to beliefs in most African society) is ‘ideally’ left behind for the male subjects in the family. - Rehema Chacage on her work, pictured above.

(via dynamicafrica)

POC Creators is a creative collective based upon uniting POC and giving us a safe space to discuss,cultivate our ideas and network.

We are accepting creative submissions of all kinds.

Articles, artworks, films, multi-media, comic books, video games, ect.

We want to help showcase YOU. If you have a creative work such as a script or film that needs critiquing, contact us.

We are here to help.

view archive



Ask me anything

Submit